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Author Topic: Metal roofing  (Read 2546 times)

nvrr49

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Metal roofing
« on: February 13, 2014, 08:14:05 PM »
I noticed we did not have a thread on metal roofing yet, so I thought I would get us started.  The roofing on this hog farrowing house is from wildwestmodels.com.   I used A&I, and dry brush of some rust colors, and a heavy coat of weathering powders (mortar color).


The flash makes it look a lot brighter than it really is.
Kent in KC
nvrr49.blogspot.com

hairball

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Re: Metal roofing
« Reply #1 on: September 16, 2019, 10:55:57 PM »
nice coloration to the corrugated aluminum panels.   But the joints should not line up they should be staggered like roofing shingles.

mike lynch...............HAIRBALL
« Last Edit: September 17, 2019, 07:50:53 PM by hairball »

postalkarl

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Re: Metal roofing
« Reply #2 on: September 17, 2019, 07:42:18 AM »
Hey Kent:

Roof color look good. I would hit it with some black A&I stain and maybe dry-brush it with light gray or silver. I prefer light gray.

Karl

GPdemayo

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Re: Metal roofing
« Reply #3 on: January 19, 2020, 12:44:04 PM »
Hi Kent.....the roofing looks good.  8)


The laps are correct for a corrugated roof installation. This type of roof is installed into the direction of the prevailing winds in the ares.....right to left or left to right. The first piece is installed at the eave and the second is installed from the first to the ridge. The next piece starts at the eave and finishes at the ridge, and so on to the opposite rake.


Standing seam metal roofing is also installed in this manner.


During the late 1800's when metal roofing began to get popular in the US, the pieces were 2' (+/-) wide and 10' to 12' in length. Today, the pieces can be ordered in lengths up to 40'. so it depends on the period you are modeling whether you will have any laps between the eave and ridge.


You can get a number of links to installation manuals on the internet.





Gregory P. DeMayo
General Construction Superintendent Emeritus
St. Louis & Denver Railroad
Longwood, FL