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Author Topic: Delaware & Northern Construction version 1.0  (Read 11095 times)

MAP

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Re: Delaware & Northern Construction version 1.0
« Reply #105 on: November 13, 2019, 06:22:55 AM »
Nice kit-bash Jerry.  Looks great!
Mark

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Re: Delaware & Northern Construction version 1.0
« Reply #106 on: November 13, 2019, 08:31:34 AM »
Jerry


Very nice work! Yes - it is modeling season.  We got 10 inches, here. The tractor has been fitted with the plow.

John,

Thanks for the compliment.  We don't have enough to plow, I'm thankful for that.
Jerry

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Re: Delaware & Northern Construction version 1.0
« Reply #107 on: November 13, 2019, 08:33:04 AM »
Nice looking buildings.

Curt,

Thanks for stopping in and the kind words. 
Jerry

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Re: Delaware & Northern Construction version 1.0
« Reply #108 on: November 13, 2019, 08:39:14 AM »
Jerry,

I like how you kit bashed the structures to fit your space. That is part of building structures I like, making changes to fit my space.

They are very well done also.

Down here, it's modeling season year round.  8)

Tom  ;D
Tom,

Thanks for your nice comment.  It is so much easier to build structures to fit the available space now I have a layout started.  It could be modeling season year around here, too.  I just need to sell the cows, the farm and move to where I don't have to plow snow.
Jerry

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Re: Delaware & Northern Construction version 1.0
« Reply #109 on: November 13, 2019, 08:40:55 AM »
Nice kit-bash Jerry.  Looks great!

Thanks, Mark.  I enjoy trying to figure out how to change a kit to better suit my era and location.
Jerry

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Re: Delaware & Northern Construction version 1.0
« Reply #110 on: January 10, 2020, 08:55:14 AM »
Slow going, still lots to do before the room is layout ready and I can move the modules into it. 
Jerry

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Re: Delaware & Northern Construction version 1.0
« Reply #111 on: January 10, 2020, 10:01:13 AM »
Jerry great progress on the layout.


And some really great looking structures.


Is the ladder for the upper level???  ;)


Jerry
"And in the end, it's not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years." A. Lincoln

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Re: Delaware & Northern Construction version 1.0
« Reply #112 on: January 13, 2020, 03:27:48 PM »

Jerry,


I used the step ladder to help me figure out how to light the room.  Here's a pic of a fluorescent fixture, tried a similar four foot LED fixture but failed to take a photo.  My bad! 


Based on my very unscientific tests I have decided to go with the fluorescents as the shadows thrown by the structures are less noticeable than when I tried the LED light.  I did price out lights of both styles with diffusers but the price more than doubled and I have no way to tell if they would help lessen the shadows. 
Jerry

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Re: Delaware & Northern Construction version 1.0
« Reply #113 on: January 13, 2020, 04:33:46 PM »
One big problem with fluorescents is that they will fade your colors, UNLESS you spend the $ to put UV shields on them.  For example, these:  https://www.amazon.com/48-Blocking-Protects-Nano-Meters-PLAS-T8TGUV/dp/B002ZPK81O


dave
Modeling the Northeast in the 1890s - because the little voices told me to

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Re: Delaware & Northern Construction version 1.0
« Reply #114 on: January 14, 2020, 07:59:18 AM »

Dave,


Thanks for your input.  I'm aware of the issue with fluorescents causing fading.  I know that George Sellios has shields on his fluorescent bulbs for just this reason. 

My first choice was to use LED lights, but the harsh shadows are a problem.  This is in part due to the location of the ceiling joists dictating the location for installing the lights.  If I could mount the LED lights in a better grid pattern, the shadows would be much less of an issue.
 



 
Jerry

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Re: Delaware & Northern Construction version 1.0
« Reply #115 on: January 14, 2020, 05:37:18 PM »
Hi Jerry,

I used LED light fixtures that I bought from Home Depot.  They were the Home Depot LED shop lights that hang from the ceiling.  They are light weight and I am really pleased with them.  Here are a couple of pictures that might give you and idea how I used them.

Steve Drees
SP RR

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Re: Delaware & Northern Construction version 1.0
« Reply #116 on: January 15, 2020, 08:36:28 AM »

Steve,


Thanks for taking time to post the photos of your layout lighting.  This is just a guess on my part, but I think the higher ceiling in your space might be the reason the LED lights work well for you.  The ceiling in my room is seven and a half feet.  This places the lights in my room only about three feet above the layout.  I think that is why the LED lights throw such dark shadows around the temporary structures I used to see how the lighting would impact the layout.  Even though the lumens produced by the LED and fluorescents are very close, the LED fixtures are definitely brighter.  To my eye, the light from the LED fixtures is more concentrated, too.  The fluorescent shop light shown in my photo seems better diffuse the light it produces than the LED shop light I tried does.   

Jerry

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Re: Delaware & Northern Construction version 1.0
« Reply #117 on: January 26, 2020, 03:06:08 PM »

I wanted to take a few minutes to update and explain my lighting choices.  I did not find any information that I felt applied to my situation, given my room size and construction.  Obviously, my options were limited by the joist locations and the layers of plaster on the ceiling.  I also wanted to light the layout in a way that allowed my to return the room to its original purpose, i.e., a bedroom without it requiring a major renovation. 


I went online and Googled some room lighting formulas.  The formulas I found were similar, but not exactly the same.  Plugging my room size and intended purpose (hobby / sewing was the closest I could find) into the formulas gave me a similar result from two I used.  Both agreed that I needed about four and a half 48" fluorescent or LED fixtures.  That rounded up to five fixtures according to both formulas. 


My original plan was to space out the lights along the center of the room with the 48" dimension oriented across the width (approximately eight foot) of the room.  I used my stepladder test fixture and found that doing this left the layout along the sides of the room in shadow while lighting what will be the center aisle. 


Once I decided that was probably not going to work I turned the test light to be parallel to the length of the room, roughly fourteen to sixteen foot.  The closet to the right of the entry door shortens the room by slightly over two feet.  After more "tests" I realized that using two lights on the shorter side and three lights on the longer side left too many shadows on the shorter side of the room.  My solution was to add a light and go with six 48" fixtures.


The next issue was that the ceiling joists were not only not on 16" centers, though not off by much.  Further, the joist on the south side were roughly 30" from the wall while the joist on the north side was about 24" from the wall.  Having tried in the past to use anchors to hang a ceiling light only to have a midnight crash, I ruled out locating any lights that could not be not attached to a joist.


I chose T8 fluorescent fixtures because my test with a 48" LED shop light threw much harsher shadows.  I did choose to purchase and use cool white fluorescent bulbs.  Dave Emery mentioned that there can be an issue with fading caused by fluorescent tubes.  There are sleeves available  that reduce if not eliminate this issue.  Tony Koester's book "Designing and Building Multi-Deck Railroads" says that modelers he spoke with found fading from fluorescents to be a non-issue.  Right now I am still in the bench work / track work stage so I have decided not to use the UV sleeves at this time.  This is something I may revisit at a later date.


One other potential option that I did not explore is to mount LED bulbs in my fixtures.  The LED bulbs for these T8 fixtures are readily available in a range of color temperatures and give off almost the same number of lumens as the fluorescent bulbs.  I may at a later date buy a couple LED bulbs and swap out the fluorescent tubes in one of the lights.  That will allow me to see if I might want to go with the LED bulbs in the future. 


I hope that my experience and choices will help others with similar spaces to address their lighting with fewer unknowns than I faced.  In the attached photos, the closet is to the right.  The corner of the closet wall shows as a slightly different color, also the blue tape is where I taped off the switch to the ceiling box after removing the light fixture.
Jerry