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Author Topic: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report  (Read 45889 times)

GPdemayo

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Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
« Reply #720 on: August 02, 2020, 09:26:22 AM »
Sorry I missed a perfect operating session.....good story Bill.  :)
Gregory P. DeMayo
General Construction Superintendent Emeritus
St. Louis & Denver Railroad
Longwood, FL

PaulS

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Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
« Reply #721 on: August 02, 2020, 09:49:13 AM »
As always Bill, a wonderful story that easily takes us back to a time and place in a bygone era ...   thanks again for our weekly time travel to perhaps simpler times, much appreciated!


All the best to the Saturday Buddy group with both Isaias and the pandemic.
Be well and stay safe,
--Paul
Modeling the Atlantic & White Mtn Railway

ReadingBob

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Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
« Reply #722 on: August 02, 2020, 10:04:35 AM »
Great story Bill.  That does sound like something a self professed 'efficiency' expert would come up with.  Truly a Dilbert moment.   ;D
Bob Butts
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Judge

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Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
« Reply #723 on: August 02, 2020, 01:33:55 PM »
Greg, Paul, Bob, Karl, and Curt -  Thanks for the kind comments.  The many victims of the evil geniuses in Human Resources will identify with this week's story. 

We are hunkered down for the virus and this small hurricane that is on its way up the East Coast of Florida.  I can't pronounce the name of this particular storm, but, like all the others, it too will pass. If the storm knocks out our power for any lengthy period of time, we plan on checking into one of the area hotels and eating through room service until power is restored.  Social distancing, you know. 

We have a good time making videos.  Our video cameras are just little Sonys and that limits our ability to get creative.  We plan on upgrading our video production capabilities when we get around to it.  We could start with a mini-cam that we can mount on a flatcar for track level viewing, along with a program we can use for editing.  Sometimes we have to reshoot a scene several times because a whistle didn't blow on time, an engine derailed, a train went into the wrong siding, or an engine stalled on a turnout.  This causes laughter and an occasional cuss word.  Fortunately, the expense of videoing is minimal due to digital technology eliminating the cost of film and development. 

I am searching the April, 1938 Railroad Magazine for ideas for next week's story.  Signing off for now.

deemery

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Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
« Reply #724 on: August 02, 2020, 01:53:35 PM »
Here's a nicely done layout "ride along" video, and some notes on how he did it in the associated blog posts:  http://sandcrr.blogspot.com/2020/07/a-moving-picture-made-on-s.html


dave
Modeling the Northeast in the 1890s - because the little voices told me to

Judge

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Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
« Reply #725 on: August 04, 2020, 04:09:29 PM »
Dave - Thanks for the video.  It is much better than most.  I have seen dozens of these videos and most of them are terrible.  I have come up with a few suggestions (Rules?) that will make model RR videos more fun to watch. (Lawyers always like Rules.)
 
1.  Plan ahead.  Make sure the scene (as seen through the camera) shows railroad and not layout clutter, children's toys, and exposed ceilings.
2.  No full-size people or their voices or noises allowed in the video.
3.  Add variety.  Include shots other than shots taken from the cowcatcher.  Run-byes, switching, helper service, station stops and the like add interest to what otherwise looks like a home movie.
4.  Use short sentences and phrases to explain what is being viewed - "Big River Crossing," and" the Pacific begins the grade" are examples.
5. Spend the money and get a decent camera.  Download a user friendly program to edit the video.

Attached is an example of a video taken on the A&S several years ago that should rate no more than a "D."  Admittedly, the video photographer had no chance to edit the video, but there wasn't more than a minute or two worth salvaging.  The trip through the staging area (the Bottoms) was unnecessary and way too much time was taken on the Ovalix.  Additionally, the engineer failed to advance the throttle a notch or two at appropriate times and the whole trip was in notch 1. (I think I was the engineer.) I could go on and on.
 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2jdPxNygosE&t=79s

On the other hand, I saw an excellent video yesterday.  It is attached also. It could be improved if the narrator had more of a Southern accent.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uwx-b-czSSo



ACL1504

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Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
« Reply #726 on: August 04, 2020, 04:20:12 PM »
NOTE:  This was a video shot by a third party and not by the Atlantic and Southern Video Staff. Just making that clear.

Tom ;D
If you hate plan A, you are certainly not going to like plan B!

Tom Langford
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tct855

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Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
« Reply #727 on: August 04, 2020, 07:31:13 PM »
Nice video regardless who filmed it.  Great scenery is great scenery.  Very cool!  Thanx Thom...

Judge

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Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
« Reply #728 on: August 08, 2020, 05:12:28 PM »
Saturday Report - August 7, 2020  (Meeting held a day early due to schedule conflict)

The Board of Directors met promptly at 0830 hours and engaged in major discussions.  We discovered the A&S has an undec A-B set of Walthers E7s.  These have been in a stack under the layout for who knows how long.   Such a discovery must be put to good use.  While the A&S has a number of locomotives lettered for the road, it has no diesels.  Since those pesky things appear to be here to stay, the A&S has decided to acquire the aforesaid E7's and paint them for the A&S.  Naturally, the question arose as to just what color(s) should be selected for the diesels.  The tentative agreement reached isfor the A&S management to forecast the future and apply a scheme that will resemble the black and yellow scheme applied to ACL diesels after the road phased out the purple and silver around 1957.  The management thought a silver body with a purple stripe about 30" wide on the lower part would remind all fans of the ACL but would foretell the future of the road.  This project is on hold for further study.

The A&S recently acquired a device called an Accutrack II Speedometer.  This device is powered by two Tripple A batteries and looks like a short tunnel.  As a locomotive passes through it, the device measures the speed and publishes the result on an led display.  This handy gadget is most useful in speed matching locomotives for a consist.  Speed matching has become of great interest to your reporter lately and it is amazing how many videos on the subject can be found on Utube.  The videos by the DCC Guy are the easiest to follow. He uses the Accutrack II to demonstrate.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3nVycLtC-pM

The meeting  next week will also be a day early due to the Babe's monthly hair appointment.

There is Covid -19 all around us here in Central Florida, but none of us are infected - at least not yet.  Your reporter and his spouse are basically hunkered down except tor occasional forays out to the grocery store and your reporter's trip to the A&S property.  "If you don't like a mask, you really won't like a ventilator!"

This week's story comes from the same addition of Railroad Magazine as last week's story - April, 1938.  The caboose is possibly the most interesting of all rolling stock.  It was required on the end of freight trians for over 100 years and the definition of a train included an end car with "markers."  The number of stories about these rolling bunk houses abound and here are two of them - One from the NC&StL and the other from the Pennsy.

                                                                                                             Life in The Caboose

    Down on the NC&StL, sometime before the depression, the crews used to have an unpaid member called a "caboose helper."  He was an ambitious colored boy who attached himself to the crew.  He cleaned lamps, cleaned windows, polished the markers, and generally kept the crummy spotless.  He became a first class cook who could make a meal as good as in any restaurant in Chattanooga on top of a pot-bellied stove.  He washed dishes after each meal and polished the conductor's shoes before a drag pulled into a terminal.  Then he departed until the next morning's run.  For all of this he got his meals free when on the road and usually picked up a dollar or two from the rest of the crew for his efforts.
    Signing on as a "caboose helper" may seem like a menial job, but in those days railroads paid better wages than laborers received.  Lots of railroads in the South hired Negro brakemen, but they had to learn the job while they worked it.  Competition for brakeman's jobs was fierce and, since the "caboose helpers" were a known quantity who had experience working with the train crews, they had an advantage.  After a "caboose helper" had been on the job for five or six months, his conductor woudl give him a letter "to whom it may concern" stating the bearer was a "qualified brakeman," and you could bet all the cotton in Jaw-ja he was.  Some of these men made the railroad a career and a few were promoted to firemen. 
    On the Pennsy, there was a crew of boomers who decided to stick around long enough to get a stake before moving on.  Most of the cabooses on the Pennsy had their interiors painted a sickly cream color.  This particular crew decided to make their crummy home and mooched paint from the shop foreman.  They painted the ceiling a dark green.  Then thry sanded down the walls and applied a coat of varnish to them.  They somehow found comfortable mattress cushions for the bunks in the cabin and took up residence there to avoid paying boarding house prices for a place to stay.  Their crummy was the envy of the division.  They even got the RIP track crew to jack her up and grease the springs until the crummy rode like a Pullman.  The trainmaster heard about the accomodations and regularly rode with the crew  when his schedule required his movement along the division. 
    But it wasn't to last.  One of the boomers did a job of short flagging and an extra piled into the caboose, which went up in smoke from the fire in the stove.  The flagman was fired and his partner quit.  They ended up in North Carolina working a shay on a logging pike. 
    The caboose is gone from the rails nowadays, but old-timers remember the red car at the end of the train fondly.   

PRR Modeler

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Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
« Reply #729 on: August 08, 2020, 06:10:31 PM »
Another great story Bill.
Curt Webb
The Late Great Pennsylvania Railroad
Freelanced PRR Bellevue Subdivision

GPdemayo

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Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
« Reply #730 on: August 09, 2020, 09:20:12 AM »
Good one Bill..... ;)
Gregory P. DeMayo
General Construction Superintendent Emeritus
St. Louis & Denver Railroad
Longwood, FL

ReadingBob

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Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
« Reply #731 on: August 10, 2020, 06:51:12 AM »
Good one Bill.  I sure miss seeing a caboose at the end of a train.  A flashing rear end device doesn't hold any appeal at all.    :'(
Bob Butts
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Jim Donovan

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Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
« Reply #732 on: August 10, 2020, 11:22:30 AM »
Loved the story, like going back in time.

Jim D
Holland & Odessa R.R.