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Author Topic: Building an REA Freight House  (Read 1227 times)

nycjeff

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Re: Building an REA Freight House
« Reply #45 on: March 30, 2021, 04:36:20 PM »
Hey Bernd, glad that you are getting something worthwhile from my build thread. Like you, I have picked up many useful tips and techniques from members of the forum. The fact that everyone puts their knowledge and experience out there for all to see is what makes this hobby and the forum so great.
Jeff Firestone
Morristown, Arizona
modeling the New York Central in rural Ohio in the late 1940's

nycjeff

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Re: Building an REA Freight House
« Reply #46 on: April 01, 2021, 01:50:50 PM »
Continuing on...



Next is the hip roof for the second story office sub-assembly. I started out by cutting a square piece of cardboard for the base of the roof and then glued it to the top of the walls. I then cut  some triangular pieces of cardboard as shown to give me some support for the roof cards. Next I glued the support pieces to the flat roof base.



I then cut four more triangular shaped pieces of roof card to form the hip roof. There was a lot of trial and error involved in this process. I finally got the four pieces to fit together properly at the seams as shown. The roof is now ready for some shingles.



This is another view of the second story office sub-assembly with the roof cards installed.



I decided that I wanted a clerestory window roof  addition for my warehouse. I saw this on several of Cliff Powers Magnolia Route layout structures and liked the look. I cut out the four wall pieces from the clapboard siding and then cut out the window openings. I used the same 1/8 square strip-wood for the bracing.



I painted the windows with rattle can flat red primer. I wanted the windows to be tilted open and Tichy offered a perfect option.



I first sprayed the walls with rattle can dark grey primer and then dry brushed them with my Forest Green craft paint. I glued on the 1/16 square corner trim pieces and after sponging on some light grey to the windows, glued them in place. More in a minute.
Jeff Firestone
Morristown, Arizona
modeling the New York Central in rural Ohio in the late 1940's

nycjeff

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Re: Building an REA Freight House
« Reply #47 on: April 01, 2021, 02:09:32 PM »


The walls have been glued together and the tilt out windows have been installed. I cut out a roof card and glued it to the top of the walls.



Here is a view of the clerestory roof addition with the roof card glued on. The roof is now ready for either shingles or roll-roofing material, I haven't decided which at this point.



Next is a long freight dock for the trackside of the warehouse building. I am using a deck template from a KC Workshop kit I built a while back. I used 8x8 strip-wood for the frame of the dock. I then used 2x8 strip-wood for the floor joists, gluing them using the spacing on the template.



I then glued on 2x10 strip-wood for the deck boards. I cut them into HO scale 8, 10, 12 and 16 foot lengths.



Turning over the dock I glued 2x4 strip-wood for cross bracing between the dock legs which are the same 8x8 strip-wood that I used for the dock framing.



I then used 2x4 strip-wood for bracing across the front and back of the dock. There is always a lot of small wood pieces involved in building a dock, but the end result is worth the work. That's it for now, more later.
Jeff Firestone
Morristown, Arizona
modeling the New York Central in rural Ohio in the late 1940's

GPdemayo

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Re: Building an REA Freight House
« Reply #48 on: April 01, 2021, 02:40:05 PM »
Good looking framing work Jeff..... 8)
Gregory P. DeMayo
General Construction Superintendent Emeritus
St. Louis & Denver Railroad
Longwood, FL

Mark Dalrymple

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Re: Building an REA Freight House
« Reply #49 on: April 01, 2021, 05:25:39 PM »
Looking really good, Jeff.

I always glue my corner trim to the gable walls so I can trim them off to the rake of the roof.

Cheers, Mark.

nycjeff

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Re: Building an REA Freight House
« Reply #50 on: April 01, 2021, 09:36:11 PM »
Good looking framing work Jeff..... 8)

Hello Greg, thanks for the nice comment, I'm having fun with this build

Looking really good, Jeff.

I always glue my corner trim to the gable walls so I can trim them off to the rake of the roof.

Cheers, Mark.

Hey Mark, thanks for checking up on me, you're right, the corner trim should be on the gable end walls to be trimmed to match the roof rake, I don't know what I was thinking- a senior moment I guess.

Jeff Firestone
Morristown, Arizona
modeling the New York Central in rural Ohio in the late 1940's

nycjeff

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Re: Building an REA Freight House
« Reply #51 on: April 06, 2021, 02:40:46 PM »
A short update on my scratch-build while I wait for more roof shingles to come in...



The man door at the end of the freight warehouse needed a landing and some stairs so I built this from strip-wood from my stash. The deck was built the same way as the long freight dock- 8x8 for the frame, 2x8 for the joists and 2x10 for the floor boards. I used 4x4 for the railing posts and 2x4 for the railings. The stairs were built using stringers from KC's Workshop and 2x8 for the treads. I stained it all with my AI solution and then weathered it with chalks.



Another view, I used my red trim color for the railings.



A bottom view with the 2x4 cross bracing. There were a lot of pieces used to build this little landing, but I am pleased with how it came out. I'm getting better with the wood railings.



I ordered 3 tab dark green shingles from Rail Scale Models with the adhesive backing and started the gable roof from the first building. The shingles go on easily and the adhesive backing eliminates the messy glue method of installing the shingles. As you can see, I turned up a few shingles with my Exacto knife and started to weather the roof with some chalks.



I also started to shingle the hip roof of the second story roof sub-assembly. That's it for now, more later when the rest of my shingles arrive.



Jeff Firestone
Morristown, Arizona
modeling the New York Central in rural Ohio in the late 1940's

S&S RR

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Re: Building an REA Freight House
« Reply #52 on: April 07, 2021, 08:48:00 AM »
Jeff


Very nice build! It looks great.
John Siekirk
Superior & Seattle Railroad

nycjeff

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Re: Building an REA Freight House
« Reply #53 on: April 07, 2021, 05:03:00 PM »
Hello John, thanks for looking in and for the kind words. I'm enjoying this build very much.
Jeff Firestone
Morristown, Arizona
modeling the New York Central in rural Ohio in the late 1940's

 

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