Author Topic: 2018 - build challenge - Downtown Deco boneyard castings  (Read 350 times)

mark dalrymple

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2018 - build challenge - Downtown Deco boneyard castings
« on: January 05, 2018, 01:16:11 AM »
Hi guys.

This build is based around the main structure of DD's Burgess manufacturing.  I few years back I bought a big box of 'boneyard' castings from Randy off ebay.  Some of the walls are pretty good, some not so good.  For this reason they were cheap.

Below is what I chose to use.

Photo 1 - Front wall.

Photo 2 - Right side wall.  This wall was very warped.  I cut a small amount off the height, both top and bottom, to line the window openings up with the front.  I cut some length off too.

Photo 3 - Left side wall.  This wall was too short.  I used an off cut from the right wall with the warp filed out and turned backwards, spliced onto the bottom of the left wall.

Photo 4 - Ruler showing the warp in the right side wall.

Photo 5 - A view of the front and right wall.  I lined the top part of the wall up vertically with the front wall and will do 'a bit of a thing' with the bottom.

Photo 6 - A view of the front and left wall.  You can see the splice.  I took a photo a while back of an awesome wall in Dunedin and hope to both find that photo to post here - and do something similar on my model.

More soon, cheers, Mark.

MAP

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Re: 2018 - build challenge - Downtown Deco boneyard castings
« Reply #1 on: January 05, 2018, 05:50:03 AM »
I'll be following along.  Will be interesting to see how you treat that warped wall.
Mark

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Re: 2018 - build challenge - Downtown Deco boneyard castings
« Reply #2 on: January 05, 2018, 07:15:26 AM »
Nice! Hydrocal is being represented in the challenge!

Dave K.

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Re: 2018 - build challenge - Downtown Deco boneyard castings
« Reply #3 on: January 05, 2018, 07:22:20 AM »
Randy’s boneyard castings can be a lot of fun to play with...I used them in a town scene back when I was a club member. Enjoy!


GPdemayo

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Re: 2018 - build challenge - Downtown Deco boneyard castings
« Reply #4 on: January 05, 2018, 10:04:24 AM »
Looking forward to your build Dave..... :)
Gregory P. DeMayo
General Construction Superintendent Emeritus
St. Louis & Denver Railroad
Longwood, FL

Donato

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Re: 2018 - build challenge - Downtown Deco boneyard castings
« Reply #5 on: January 05, 2018, 11:42:41 AM »
Hooly Hydrocal Batman!!!


I'll be following along.
Thanks,
Donato

Biding my time till I can start my layout and build nice stuff like all you folks .... (said with envy). :-)

mark dalrymple

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Re: 2018 - build challenge - Downtown Deco boneyard castings
« Reply #6 on: January 05, 2018, 03:05:58 PM »
Hi guys.

Thanks for all the replies!  I'll try to keep up consistent progress.  I'm presently also turning half of the barn into a modelling room - which is a BIG job!  The future home of the T&S (Tellynott and Shadowlands).

Map - I've taken on board the challenge adage - 'keep it simple' when addressing that very warped wall.  I could have tried to cut it straight down the middle and then splice it back together - which would have gotten rid of some of the warp, but I decided to just glue it in place with the top lined up nicely, and build up the bottom with Selleys permafilla. This also meant I could keep chugging along.

Raymo - yes, hydrocal often seems to be under represented - I did gather up a few of my wooden kits, but couldn't find anything simple that grabbed my attention.  It was this or Potters pub - and that looked like quite a bit of work.

Dave - I hope to have a lot of fun.  Its the first modelling I've done since we moved in here in mid August - there has just been so much to do!  I actually feel a lot better about things have started some modelling.  The new place is great and we love it, but 11 acres when you have lived your entire life in a city on a quarter acre or less, can get a bit overwhelming!

Gregory - thanks.  Hopefully I'll keep you interested.

Donato - holy Hydrocal indeed!  I'd forgotten how messy that stuff is!  Must remember to change into old clothes!

OK - so below are photos to get us up to date.  I did a lot of filing and fitting with a large course file, and quite a bit of cutting and trimming along with the one splice.

Photo 1 - A view from the back with my protractor sitting flat on the board.  I glued the spliced wall to the front wall first, using my square protractor to make sure things were square and left to set.  I then drew a square on the custom board (MDF) on which this is sitting, with the inside of the two side walls marked and used this as a guide when gluing the other side wall in place.  Araldite is a very sticky glue, but things slide - but only really when pushed.  And so you have a small window of two or three minutes when you can move things around a bit to line and square up.  I applied glue along the edges of the wall, keeping it back from the front of the casting to eliminate glue ooze.

Photo 2 - A view looking down.  I glued a piece of matt board in at the bass to keep things square and add some strength.  I used Araldite 2 part apoxy to glue everything together.  I find this works best with Hydrocal.  Although - with rock castings I have found an expandable foam gun brilliant!  I glued the bass in with a piece of baking paper on the desk.  Once dry this just peels off.  I first cut a hole in the center to give finger access as the build moves on.

Photo 3 - Here is the back wall I used.  You can see just how bad that warp is here.  I held this piece in place and marked the backside with a pencil.  I then cut this with a small tenon saw and finished off with a course file.  Again I mixed up some Araldite, but this time, instead of putting the glue down the edge of the wall, I put it on the inside of the partly assembled part of the structure keeping it just back from the edge.  In this way I could slide the wall into place without any glue ooze.

Photo 4 - Here is a photo of the side wall built up with permafilla.  I use a paint brush dipped in water to wet the plaster castings first and this helps the filler stick.  I use a small chisel blade to apply and smooth - adding water as needed.

More soon, cheers, Mark.




mark dalrymple

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Re: 2018 - build challenge - Downtown Deco boneyard castings
« Reply #7 on: January 09, 2018, 06:39:28 PM »
Hi guys.

I've been chipping away in my small amount of spare time so it is time for an update.  I'm trying a few things out which may or may not be successful.  Time will tell.

I had to spread multiple layers of pollyfilla on the side wall, letting dry and sanding between coats.  Once this was built up to a flat square surface I moved on to experiment number 1. 

Photo 1 - I used another one of my boneyard castings, one with stonework carved into it.  I cleaned this wall up using a dental pick.

Photo 2 - I then laid a piece of baking paper over this wall and used the edge of a pencil to transfer the pattern onto the lunch paper.

Photo 3 - I laid the patterned baking paper onto the side wall of my structure and used a clutch pencil to mark the pattern onto the wall.  I then used a dental pick to start carving the stonework into the wall.

Photo 4 - A close up of the beginning of my stonework.

More soon, cheers, Mark.


mark dalrymple

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Re: 2018 - build challenge - Downtown Deco boneyard castings
« Reply #8 on: January 11, 2018, 01:01:54 AM »
Hi guys.

A bit of carving to show you.  As I said in my last post - all done with a dental pick.

Photo 1 - From right to left we have the various stages.  At right is the baking paper copy of the DD casting drawn onto the plaster wall using a clutch pencil.  You have to push nice and hard to leave a visible line imprint on the plaster wall.  In the center are the lines scribed thinly onto the plaster wall using the dental pick.  And left is the carved stonework.

Photo 2 - Here is a close up of the scribed stonework pattern.  At this stage I'm just after the general pattern.

Photo 3 - And here is the real work.  I have to do this in several sittings as I find it quite hard on my hands and fingers - they start to cramp up after a while.  The pollyfilla goes quite hard and you have to apply quite a bit of pressure.  I try to keep the point of the pick at right angles to the wall - if you let the point curl in too much it will dig in and take big chunks out - especially where the plaster is a thin coat.  I slowly make my way, all the way, around each stone, scribing a fairly deep mortar line.  I go all the way around each stone to round off all the corners and give a natural look.  I then turn the pick and use the looped part to scrape sideways across each stone, chipping and scraping the edges off.  I also scrape some stones down a bit to give a slightly uneven texture.  Finally I go back around the mortar lines where necessary. All the while I work with a stiff paint brush at hand to work away the chippings and dust.  Any accidental 'chunks' that come off can either be worked into the wall as a blemish (I often exaggerate mistakes to make them appear like accidental natural blemishes), or, if too overt, just add pollyfilla and redo when set.

Photo 4 - Too overt at the top!  I got the pick underneath the pollyfilla while working here.  As it is near the top of the wall the filler is quite thin here and so I will have to be more careful in my second attempt.  The new pollyfilla will be set soon (as can be seen in photo 1).

More soon, cheers, Mark. 
« Last Edit: January 11, 2018, 01:07:59 AM by mark dalrymple »

Zephyrus52246

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Re: 2018 - build challenge - Downtown Deco boneyard castings
« Reply #9 on: January 11, 2018, 07:45:24 AM »
The stones look great.  They also look like a LOT of work.


Jeff

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Re: 2018 - build challenge - Downtown Deco boneyard castings
« Reply #10 on: January 11, 2018, 08:21:24 AM »
Approved by New England Brownstone !

That's how I do it for the surface texture.   I don't use a dental pick (tech name is probe) as it wanders too much for my taste.  I prefer a lab hand piece (Dremel) because you really work the grout lines and make them "pop".  On the other hand, using a handpiece is extremely messy and dangerous if you don't control the dust.  I have a dust collection system set up (shop vac and 2" PVC pipe) that removes the dust before it get near to my face.


The worst part is the time.  It's real depressing when you are looking through some type of magnification device working for 30 mins and then take a look at it at 1x and say to yourself "damn, that's all I did?"


Another trick I have found to be a real help is to set up an old hand engraver like you use to mark tools and replace the carbide tip with a chisel shaped piece of 1/8" piano wire and go to town with that.  It's much quicker and gives the stone a hammered texture.  It's not really anymore messier than doing it with a knife, just more efficient at making a mess.  You just have to be careful because it can remove too much.


The biggest thing you have to worry about is more of getting the grout-line pattern to look  realistic, but that's easy to take care of by studying real walls. 


Other than that, that's some nice looking carving.  <thumbs up emoticon>
Russ

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Re: 2018 - build challenge - Downtown Deco boneyard castings
« Reply #11 on: January 11, 2018, 10:21:40 AM »
Very nice looking stone work.
Curt Webb
The Late Great Pennsylvania Railroad
Freelanced PRR Bellevue Subdivision

mark dalrymple

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Re: 2018 - build challenge - Downtown Deco boneyard castings
« Reply #12 on: January 14, 2018, 08:31:11 PM »
Thanks Jeff, Russ and Curt.

No progress as yet - we had dog shows all weekend so no time for modelling.

Jeff - yes -  lot of work, but work I enjoy.  It is also a great job for when you have a spare 5 or 10 minutes (providing you have on your old clothes!)

Thanks Russ - good to know I have the thumbs up for an expert!

Thanks Curt - I still haven't found that wall I took a photograph of in Dunedin.  If I remember rightly it was a three story wall with stone on the first story, aged brick on the second, and plaster on the third.  It was one of those walls that just screamed out to be modeled.

Cheers, Mark.

S&S RR

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Re: 2018 - build challenge - Downtown Deco boneyard castings
« Reply #13 on: January 14, 2018, 09:29:00 PM »
Mark


Great work so far - very realistic rock walls. I bought a box of Randy's boneyard walls off eBay a few years ago, too. I used about half of the box for my Eagles Nest Yard Warehouse building. I need to pull out the box and see what else is in there after seeing your work here. I will be following along with great interest.
John Siekirk
Superior & Seattle Railroad

 

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