The Modeler's Forum

Station Stop => Layout Tours => Topic started by: jerryrbeach on February 05, 2018, 09:11:43 PM

Title: Delaware & Northern Construction version 1.0
Post by: jerryrbeach on February 05, 2018, 09:11:43 PM
I have started construction of the Delaware & Northern Railroad version 1.0. 

The prototype was originally organized in 1904 as the Delaware & Eastern, and trains were running over the line by 1906.  The tracks connected with the New York, Ontario & Western in East Branch and with the Ulster & Delaware in Arkville, running for 37 miles along the East Branch of the Delaware River near the western edge of the Catskill Mountains.  After an attempt to extend the railroad to Middleburg, NY and a connection with the Schoharie & Middleburg failed miserably leaving the railroad awash in debt, the D&E filed bankruptcy in 1910, and emerged as the Delaware & Northern.  New York City bought the railroad in 1939 to allow them to build a dam at Downsville, NY, creating the Pepacton Reservoir to supply water to the city.  Today over half of the Delaware & Northern roadbed resides at the bottom of the reservoir, along with the villages and farms that once occupied the valley.

I live alone in a large farmhouse.  Despite extensive remodeling including wall and ceiling insulation, replacement windows, and new siding my house is very expensive to heat.  In the winter I close off the entire upstairs, move my dining room furniture to the living room, bring a few comfortable chairs into the dining room, and close off the living room as well.  Because of this, potential bedroom or basement locations for a layout suffer from a lack of heat.  After spending some time thinking about how I might build a layout, I decided the best approach would be to construct something easy to disassemble and move in the future.

In the past couple months I have worked through several failed attempts to design a layout that could be disassembled for moving.  I constructed and then discarded components that were too cumbersome to move easily, others that lacked rigidity, and some that warped after assembly.  In short, I found designing lightweight portable construction to be its own challenge. 

I have settled on a module or domino system for construction using separate tables, each with its own complete set of legs. This was done so that I can assemble or disassemble the layout by myself without worrying about how to support a section that lacks all four legs.  I built it so the table tops detach from the leg assemblies for ease of relocation, thinking that would make it easier to negotiate stairs.  Each table is connected to the adjoining table with carriage bolts.  At this time, the  layout consists of three modules, two that are 30 x 48 and bolt end to end.  A third 24 by 36 table is bolted to the front left side of one of the larger modules, resulting in an L shaped layout with an overall dimension of 66 by 96.  It currently resides in one corner of my dining room, but is sized so that it will fit into a spare bedroom.  It could also become part of a larger basement layout should I decide to go that route.

If you want to come along for the ride, get your ticket, grab a coach seat, and settle in for a slow and somewhat bumpy ride, not unlike passenger service on the real Delaware & Northern. 
Title: Re: Delaware & Northern Construction version 1.0
Post by: MAP on February 06, 2018, 07:42:51 AM
I'll be following along, bumpy ride and all.
Title: Re: Delaware & Northern Construction version 1.0
Post by: Zephyrus52246 on February 06, 2018, 07:44:34 AM
I'm on board.


Jeff
Title: Re: Delaware & Northern Construction version 1.0
Post by: S&S RR on February 06, 2018, 08:04:58 AM
I just paid for my ticket - I'm along for the ride.  Sounds like a great project.
Title: Re: Delaware & Northern Construction version 1.0
Post by: Blazeman on February 06, 2018, 08:08:11 AM
Like anything, you have to build it from the ground up. You're taking the best path....getting a solid foundation or in your situation, a foundation both solid and mobile, one step at a time, assessing, then revising or moving to the next one. Your patience and persistence is admirable. Will look in on your reports.
Title: Re: Delaware & Northern Construction version 1.0
Post by: ACL1504 on February 06, 2018, 09:17:53 AM
Jerry,

Count me in with all the others. I'll be watching and learning.

Tom  ;D
Title: Re: Delaware & Northern Construction version 1.0
Post by: jerryrbeach on February 06, 2018, 01:10:00 PM
I'll be following along, bumpy ride and all.

Mark,
It got really bumpy in the later years, some rail joints were a couple inches apart.   Thanks for coming along.
Title: Re: Delaware & Northern Construction version 1.0
Post by: jerryrbeach on February 06, 2018, 01:10:26 PM
I'm on board.


Jeff

Jeff,
Glad to have you along, enjoy the ride.
Title: Re: Delaware & Northern Construction version 1.0
Post by: jerryrbeach on February 06, 2018, 01:11:59 PM
Like anything, you have to build it from the ground up. You're taking the best path....getting a solid foundation or in your situation, a foundation both solid and mobile, one step at a time, assessing, then revising or moving to the next one. Your patience and persistence is admirable. Will look in on your reports.

Thanks for coming on the ride.  I'm going to post a few of my not so successful ideas in hopes of saving someone else time and effort.
Title: Re: Delaware & Northern Construction version 1.0
Post by: jerryrbeach on February 06, 2018, 01:13:18 PM
Jerry,

Count me in with all the others. I'll be watching and learning.

Tom  ;D

Tom,
Really glad to have you along.  I strongly suspect you'll be doing a lot more watching than learning.
Title: Re: Delaware & Northern Construction version 1.0
Post by: jerryrbeach on February 06, 2018, 01:23:14 PM
The conductor has hollered, "All aboarrrd', and I can hear the whistle echoing off the surrounding hills, so lets get this party started.

My house, except for a small addition was built prior to 1900.  Like most houses of this age, things sag.  That means simply, there is not a level floor to be found.  I had to have some kind of adjustable legs to keep the layout level.  I thought, "Why not use furniture hardware to attach and adjust the legs?"   

First of all, the plastic feet were too soft and deformed easily.  That was an easy fix, replace the feet with PVC pipe caps.  I made some 2x2 legs by ripping 2x4's and drilled the ends for the leveling feet.  I used 5/16" Tee nuts, 3/4" PVC pipe caps, and 5/16" x 2 1/2" carriage bolts. This solved the leveling problem.  I was off and running. 

I should mention the most difficult part of making the leg levelers was centering the hole I drilled in the PVC pipe caps.  The ends of the caps were rounded and the drill bit wanted to wander off center despite using a center punch to mark the hole location. 
Title: Re: Delaware & Northern Construction version 1.0
Post by: jerryrbeach on February 06, 2018, 01:35:04 PM
I fastened a 1"x4" to the bottom of the layout and screwed the commercial leg hardware to it.  Then I drilled the 2x2' legs and inserted a hanger bolt in the end.  The hanger bolts have a 5/16" machine thread on one end that fits into the leg hardware, a lag on the other that goes into the end of the leg.  I screwed the lag end into the leg, tightened the threaded end into the bracket, and my table shook like a willow in a windstorm.  I added horizontal and diagonal bracing.  Much better, but still not as rigid as I would like.

Now I am guessing you already see the problem with all this...   Once I added the bracing, it was no longer easy to detach the legs from the table.  First, all the bracing had to be removed, then the layout needed to be supported while each leg was unscrewed.  Back to the drawing board...

I decided to move on and build the table tops while I waited for inspiration to solve the leg problem.     
Title: Re: Delaware & Northern Construction version 1.0
Post by: Janbouli on February 06, 2018, 01:45:00 PM
Missed the train but I'll catch up

(https://media0.giphy.com/media/QIKJAskDEk3Ru/giphy.gif)
Title: Re: Delaware & Northern Construction version 1.0
Post by: jerryrbeach on February 06, 2018, 01:50:08 PM
I built a basic frame from 1x4 lumber, nothing unusual or fancy.  I topped the tables with some nice clean 1/4" plywood.  The frames were screwed together with sheet rock screws, the plywood was nailed in place with some small finish nails courtesy of my air nailer. 

Now I had an idea for legs.  I would use 1x3 and 1x4 lumber screwed together to make an L shaped leg.  I would screw 12" long pieces of the 2x2's to the bottom of the legs, with the leg levelers in the 2x2's as I had done earlier.  FWIW, if I were building a permanent layout, this is the leg construction I would use. 

I was pretty happy with this design until I began to wonder how to fasten the legs to the tables in a way that they could be detached easily.  I drew a blank. 

My final design was to go back to the 2x2 legs.  I screwed two pieces of 2x2 to the farme of the table top, making a socket for each leg to fit into.  At first I had a problem trying to get the sockets sized right so the legs would slip in and out of the sockets easily, but keep the sockets tight enough to avoid the legs moving within the socket.  I solved that issue by using pieces of .020 chipboard (leftover roof cards) as a spacer when fastening the socket pieces to the frame.

This worked great until I started moving the tables around while adding the leg bracing.  At that time it became apparent that the 1/4" plywood that I had used as a weight saving measure was not going to work.  Back to the lumber yard, get some 1/2' plywood and some 1" long sheet rock screws.  Replace the tops, tables are heavier, but now the table assemblies are rock solid. 
Title: Re: Delaware & Northern Construction version 1.0
Post by: jerryrbeach on February 06, 2018, 01:53:27 PM
Jan,
That is really not a problem.

In later years the D&N provided passenger service using a Brill gasoline car.  It was dubbed "The Red Heifer" by the locals due to its color and "Blat" horn.  It would stop along the line to take children to school or pick up riders.

Glad to have you along!
 
Title: Re: Delaware & Northern Construction version 1.0
Post by: Janbouli on February 06, 2018, 06:02:24 PM
(http://www.trainweb.org/oldtimetrains/images/durr405.jpg)
Title: Re: Delaware & Northern Construction version 1.0
Post by: jerryrbeach on February 06, 2018, 08:06:03 PM
Jan,
That is a photo of the Delaware & Ulster Rail Ride's diesel rail car.  It was painted like and named for the Delaware & Northern car.  The DURR operates a tourist train in both directions on the former Ulster & Delaware tracks out of Arkville, NY, the point where the D&N interchanged with the U&D. 
Title: Re: Delaware & Northern Construction version 1.0
Post by: jerryrbeach on February 06, 2018, 08:21:42 PM
I thought I would take a moment to explain my high tech lighting solution to a portable layout.  As I mentioned in my introductory post, at this time, the layout resides in my dining room.  Like most dining rooms, the lighting consists primarily of a chandelier in the center of the room. 

My original thought was to run a 1x2 or 1x3 vertically up the rear of the modules behind the Masonite backdrop and use the clamp on lights. I had planned to fasten it to the cross brace for the legs using a spacer, and screw it to the rear frame member of the table.
 
Then it occurred to me it would be easier to balance the lights to eliminate shadows if I could move them horizontally after I had installed them.  I looked for and found the quart of wall paint I had saved for touchup.  That made it an easy decision to hunt up a spare piece of 2x3, locate the studs behind the sheet rock and use three screws to attach the 2x3 to the wall.  When I move the layout, a little spackle and a quick touchup and the wall will be good as new, or at least no worse than it was before. 

I strongly recommend that you not try this shortcut unless you have no significant other to answer to.
Title: Re: Delaware & Northern Construction version 1.0
Post by: jerryrbeach on February 07, 2018, 10:28:37 AM
The backdrop is made from 1/8" Masonite.  Quarter inch thick Masonite would probably be better because it is less flexible, but the lumber for this project has already wreaked havoc on my modeling budget, so I went with what I had on hand.

As part of this I have one corner module.  Once I had the Masonite screwed in place with one piece overlapping the end of the other piece, I needed to fasten them securely to keep them in alignment.  I went to my pile of saved lumber and dug out a piece of 1/4" Masonite paneling.  I ripped a couple pieces 2 1/2" wide the height of the backdrop and glued and nailed them together at a 90 degree angle.  I then glued them to the back of the corner, fastening them to the module frame with a screw, and using clamps to hold the top tight until the glue dried. 

The other seams are held in alignment by 2" wide pieces of 1/8" Masonite with a 1" x 2" wide block glued to the top edge.  I then glued a 2" x 2" piece of Masonite onto the 1" x 2" block making a 1" deep socket that I slid over the top edge where the backdrop panels meet.  I used a screw to fasten the bottom of this piece to the back frame rail.  I used no glue for this, so after removing the screw, the modules and backdrop simply pull apart.  The blocks show at the very top of the backdrop, but I do not find them objectionable. 

Title: Re: Delaware & Northern Construction version 1.0
Post by: GPdemayo on February 07, 2018, 02:47:15 PM
Hey Jerry.....you're making Rube Goldberg proud.  ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: Delaware & Northern Construction version 1.0
Post by: jerryrbeach on February 08, 2018, 09:05:49 AM
Greg,

It's a well kept secret that Rube honed his craft as my apprentice. Ssshh.  Don't tell!

Follow along for lots more simple solutions to complex problems.
Title: Re: Delaware & Northern Construction version 1.0
Post by: jerryrbeach on February 08, 2018, 09:19:30 AM
I decided to try using 1" foam under the tracks on this layout.  I have always used Homasote in the past but decided to change it up.  My thinking was that the foam would be easier to remove to allow for some variation in the terrain.

I used a tube of Liquid Nails latex construction adhesive to bond the foam to the plywood.  I protected the top of the foam using the 1/4" plywood pieces I had removed from a prior construction effort.  As you can see, I got pretty creative when finding weights to hold everything down. I don't know if it was necessary, but I left the weights in place overnight.

After removing the weights, I found some of the foam panels had slightly different heights where they met.  Out came the sander and in just a few minutes the joints were much better.  While this did create a little dust, most of it was caught by the bag on the sander.

One thing I had not realized until I started measuring is that 2' x 8' foam sheets really aren't.  The ones I have are more like 23 3/4" x 95 1/2".  In order to have the edges line up exactly with the ends of the modules, there was a place where the sheets did not meet tightly in the center of the module.  I filled this gap with some Dap Dry Dex joint compound.  This filler starts out pink and turns white when it is dry.  It took a couple coats to get it nice and even.  I used a wet sponge to clean up (wet sand?) any excess after it dried. 
Title: Re: Delaware & Northern Construction version 1.0
Post by: GPdemayo on February 08, 2018, 09:22:00 AM
Greg,

It's a well kept secret that Rube honed his craft as my apprentice. Ssshh.  Don't tell!

Follow along for lots more simple solutions to complex problems.


You're secret is safe with me..... ;)
Title: Re: Delaware & Northern Construction version 1.0
Post by: jerryrbeach on February 08, 2018, 09:23:17 AM
Now I'm at a point where I'm a little stuck.

In the past I have simply chosen a color that looked like blue sky and painted the backdrop a uniform blue color. 

I would like to try to blend some white into the blue and lighten the sky as it gets closer to the horizon.  I've watched a couple videos on how to do this, but I'm looking for any tips that might make this easier for a rookie.  Anyone done this?  Any tips?
Title: Re: Delaware & Northern Construction version 1.0
Post by: jerryrbeach on February 08, 2018, 09:24:06 AM
Greg,

It's a well kept secret that Rube honed his craft as my apprentice. Ssshh.  Don't tell!

Follow along for lots more simple solutions to complex problems.


You're secret is safe with me..... ;)

Thanks, I'll sleep a lot better tonight.
Title: Re: Delaware & Northern Construction version 1.0
Post by: deemery on February 08, 2018, 10:24:22 AM
Now I'm at a point where I'm a little stuck.

In the past I have simply chosen a color that looked like blue sky and painted the backdrop a uniform blue color. 

I would like to try to blend some white into the blue and lighten the sky as it gets closer to the horizon.  I've watched a couple videos on how to do this, but I'm looking for any tips that might make this easier for a rookie.  Anyone done this?  Any tips?
Here's a thought, try this on some scrap before going for real:  Get both white paint and sky blue paint.  Put a relatively thin band of white paint (water the paint a little bit) along the horizon.  Then dip your brush into the blue paint, start at the bottom and pull up to the top of the sky.  The idea is to mix the still wet white paint in with the blue paint.  You'll probably want a roller to even things out.


dave
Title: Re: Delaware & Northern Construction version 1.0
Post by: jbvb on February 08, 2018, 12:11:38 PM
Dave's proposal sounds like it would work. What I did on my own layout was start out with Sherwin Williams 'Baby Blue' (a pretty light blue) for the base coat and paint a stripe of much darker blue at the top, then blend with mostly horizontal strokes.
Title: Re: Delaware & Northern Construction version 1.0
Post by: jerryrbeach on February 09, 2018, 09:25:49 AM
Now I'm at a point where I'm a little stuck.

In the past I have simply chosen a color that looked like blue sky and painted the backdrop a uniform blue color. 

I would like to try to blend some white into the blue and lighten the sky as it gets closer to the horizon.  I've watched a couple videos on how to do this, but I'm looking for any tips that might make this easier for a rookie.  Anyone done this?  Any tips?
Here's a thought, try this on some scrap before going for real:  Get both white paint and sky blue paint.  Put a relatively thin band of white paint (water the paint a little bit) along the horizon.  Then dip your brush into the blue paint, start at the bottom and pull up to the top of the sky.  The idea is to mix the still wet white paint in with the blue paint.  You'll probably want a roller to even things out.


dave

Dave,

I definitely planned to practice on some extra pieces of Masonite.  The demos I have seen started with the blue and added the white, blending the colors with a brush.  I have doubts I could do that without leaving brush marks.  I think starting with the white and using a roller are both good suggestions.  Thanks for your input.
Title: Re: Delaware & Northern Construction version 1.0
Post by: jerryrbeach on February 09, 2018, 09:31:10 AM
Dave's proposal sounds like it would work. What I did on my own layout was start out with Sherwin Williams 'Baby Blue' (a pretty light blue) for the base coat and paint a stripe of much darker blue at the top, then blend with mostly horizontal strokes.

James,

I'm still thinking this over, but I like your idea.  I might go with three colors, by mixing some white into a container of blue to give me a light blue rather than trying to blend the darker blue and white directly on the backdrop.  I'm thinking this might help me extend the drying time.  I am concerned that if I do not work quickly enough I could get myself in a mess.  Thanks for your suggestion.  I need to give this a little more thought, and then practice on a spare piece of Masonite.
Title: Re: Delaware & Northern Construction version 1.0
Post by: ACL1504 on February 09, 2018, 09:33:08 AM
Jerry,

Looking great my friend. Very well done. I see you use the same type weights I do to hold the foam down.  8)


Tom ;D
Title: Re: Delaware & Northern Construction version 1.0
Post by: jerryrbeach on February 09, 2018, 09:44:36 AM
Over the years, I have tried a few methods of track planning.

First, I started by sketching freehand, but what I drew never, ever fit when it came time to lay the track.

Then, I dug out my old drafting supplies and started drawing everything to scale.  You guessed it, when it came time to lay track, it still didn't fit. 

I tried to learn some track planning software on the computer but found I spent more time yelling at the computer than actually getting anything done. (Stupid computers do not seem to listen or care.)

A friend suggested I mark out my space on a clear area of the floor and then apply masking tape where I wanted the track.  I tried this, but found getting back up took longer than the time I spent crawling around the floor laying tape. 

I fell back on the simplest method I could think to use.  Lay out a sheet of brown paper and use actual track and a marker to draw the building footprints.  I also use some cardstock mockups of structures.   

While I keep playing with the track arrangement, I have been sorting thru potential backdrop photos.
Title: Re: Delaware & Northern Construction version 1.0
Post by: jerryrbeach on February 09, 2018, 09:46:18 AM
Jerry,

Looking great my friend. Very well done. I see you use the same type weights I do to hold the foam down.  8)


Tom ;D

Tom,

Thanks for dropping by and your kind words.  I was beginning to think I wouldn't find enough "weights", but I did.
Title: Re: Delaware & Northern Construction version 1.0
Post by: jerryrbeach on February 13, 2018, 01:02:11 PM
I haven't had a lot of time to devote to working on the layout in the last few days. 

I have pretty well finalized the track plan.  I'm sure I will make some small changes when I start laying track, but it is very close.  I sprayed the track with a Rustoleum Camo brown rattle can.  I plan to paint the rails and weather the ties after the track is in place, but this supplies a base color to work from.

I primed the Masonite backdrop, and used some earth colored latex to coat the pink and blue foam.  Like the track, this is just an undercoat to help keep the glaring pink foam from showing through later should the scenery be damaged.

I have been doing some practice backdrop painting on a piece of scrap Masonite.  I have also been looking at backdrop photo options.  The photos I had planned to use didn't really give me the effect I was looking for when I taped them to the backdrop and left them there for a few days. 

That's about it for now. 
Title: Re: Delaware & Northern Construction version 1.0
Post by: ACL1504 on February 13, 2018, 04:37:11 PM
Jerry,

Nice and clean, for now anyway. Looking forward to seeing the track plan. This is going to be fun.

Tom  ;D
Title: Re: Delaware & Northern Construction version 1.0
Post by: jerryrbeach on February 14, 2018, 09:06:23 AM
Jerry,

Nice and clean, for now anyway. Looking forward to seeing the track plan. This is going to be fun.

Tom  ;D

Tom,

Thanks for checking in.  You're right, for me the fun part is just starting. 
Title: Re: Delaware & Northern Construction version 1.0
Post by: jerryrbeach on February 14, 2018, 09:21:14 AM
My backdrop painting adventure did not turn out as I had hoped and planned. 

If you recall, I had hoped to fade the blue sky to a lighter hue as it approached the horizon.  My practice panel gave me a chance to blend the colors using a foam brush.  I attempted to do the same on the backdrop, working on each section (module) of the backdrop separately.  I started with my sky blue color and mixed a lighter color by adding white to it until it looked more "horizon like" to me.  I used a roller to roll the darker blue across the 8" more or less of the top, then rolled the lighter blue across the bottom.  I used a foam brush to try to pull the colors together and blend them.  This seemed to work OK if I worked very quickly, given how fast the paint was drying.  Once I finished and everything dried completely, I had two different blue colors, the issue was that they did not really fade or blend, but I was left with a line across the sky where the color changed. 

At that point, I decided to cut my losses, admit I have less than zero artistic talent, paint the entire backdrop with one shade of blue, and move on. 

Side note:  I used 1/8" Masonite for the backdrop as I have a good supply of it that cost me nothing.  When assembling the modules, I worked hard to line the seams between the sections as tightly as possible.  After applying the paint, the Masonite moved all on its own, and not in unison.  The tightest backdrop seam at assembly is now the most uneven.  I did not prime the back of the Masonite, and thus do not know if that would have helped, but it is something I will try next time. 
Title: Re: Delaware & Northern Construction version 1.0
Post by: jerryrbeach on February 14, 2018, 09:47:09 AM
Time for a brief, I hope, history lesson on the D&N. 

The D&N, when constructed, connected a group of small villages along the East Branch of the Delaware River, most with fewer than 500 inhabitants.  The valley widened along the northern half of the railroad and the area economy was based on primarily on agriculture.  Almost every village had a creamery, most built by the railroad.  After milk, lumber in many forms, bluestone, and vegetable crops were the norm.  The predominant type of manufacturing was based on the lumber industry, with a barrel stave factory, handle factory, shingle mill, excelsior mills, and wood acid factories.

The D&N, for the most part, followed a simple formula when it came to the trackage serving the villages.  Most featured a passing siding and anywhere from one to a few spurs serving the needs of that village.  I based my freelance plan for this layout on the way the D&N served its customers. 

My basic plan is a passing siding with here industrial spurs serving the local industries.  There is a longer spur that curves onto the "L" section of the layout, for whatever industry ends up in that space.  I also added a couple tracks next to the backdrop that can be used for staging when the layout is expanded. 

As indicated in an earlier post, I covered the layout in brown paper and laid track and switches on the paper, rearranging them multiple times until I got what I felt would fit in the space and offer a reasonable amount of operation.  I then drew the outline of the track and switches on the paper. 
I slipped my cutting mat under the paper and used a scalpel and straight edge to cut out the paper about 1/8" wide along the center of the straight sections.  I did the same at the ends of the switches, and at various points where the track was curved.  I used a marker to draw through the slots I had cut, thus transferring the plan onto the brown painted foam. I pulled off the paper and had the bare bones of the plan drawn onto the foam.

I had noted the radius of the curved sections (remember I drew the plan using actual sectional track components), and I simply wrote these numbers in the appropriate places on the foam.  I then used a trammel stick to draw in the curve centerlines.  Of course, not everything transferred exactly, so I used the track components to double check that everything would more or less fit as planned. 
Title: Re: Delaware & Northern Construction version 1.0
Post by: ACL1504 on February 14, 2018, 05:57:20 PM
Jerry,

You are having to much fun! However, it is looking good.

I enjoyed the history of the D&N and what you are planning for switching, lots of opportunities.

I'm getting anxious to start my third level so I can have more fun myself.

Tom  ;D
Title: Re: Delaware & Northern Construction version 1.0
Post by: jerryrbeach on February 15, 2018, 08:49:45 AM
Tom,

Thanks for looking in and your nice comment.

It should go without saying, but I'll say it anyway; I'll be watching the next phase of the A&S construction.
Title: Re: Delaware & Northern Construction version 1.0
Post by: jerryrbeach on February 16, 2018, 09:09:00 AM
I mentioned earlier that I envision using these modules as part of an ongoing process toward constructing a layout.  I want to include at least basic staging so I laid out a track along the backdrop.  Then I added a passing siding to the first track.  My idea is to use structures and a low hill to somewhat block the view of the staging track.  These tracks are not really accessible with the three modules I am working on now, but rather part of the master plan. 

Since I wanted this track to be less noticeable, I laid it directly on the foam.  By doing this, I needed a way to transition from the foam to the cork roadbed.  After a little thought, I decided one way to do this would be to use wood shingles, since they already feature a nice long taper.  I had purchased purchased wood shingles for a project several years ago, and saved the ones I did not use. 
Title: Re: Delaware & Northern Construction version 1.0
Post by: S&S RR on February 16, 2018, 09:13:38 AM
Jerry


I'm really enjoying your thread - your layout is really looking great. I will be following your progress.
Title: Re: Delaware & Northern Construction version 1.0
Post by: jerryrbeach on February 16, 2018, 09:18:41 AM
Jerry


I'm really enjoying your thread - your layout is really looking great. I will be following your progress.

John,

Thanks for following along, and your nice comment. 
Title: Re: Delaware & Northern Construction version 1.0
Post by: jerryrbeach on February 16, 2018, 09:20:17 AM
I did some research online to see how other modelers fasten their track and roadbed to the surface of the layout.  Many modelers use white glue to hold the cork to the layout.  I considered using that method, but wasn't sure how well the white glue would bond with the foam.  The method I decided to use was to bond the roadbed to the foam was to use latex caulk.  Thus far, this has worked well, though I have found I need to use lots of weights to hold the cork in place while the caulk dries.  When I have had to move some of the already bonded cork roadbed, I have been able to slide a putty knife under the cork and separate it from the foam with only minor damage to the foam.

If you decide to use this method, be sure to buy the latex caulk and not the latex caulk with silicone added.
Title: Re: Delaware & Northern Construction version 1.0
Post by: jerryrbeach on February 16, 2018, 03:27:23 PM
Once I got my tables fastened together, I started thinking about an easy way to turn on my "Rube Goldberg" lighting.  My solution was to attach a power strip to one of the leg braces near the front of the layout.  Now it is not only to turn the lights on and off, I have a convenient place to plug in my Dremel, vacuum, and later the layout power. 

One reason I am building this layout is that several years ago I built a couple specific structures for Pepacton, NY.  I also purchased kits that are very similar to a couple other buildings, including the D&N station.  Unfortunately, no matter how hard I tried, I could not manage to squeeze room for Pepacton into the layout I designed for my unfinished cellar space.  Even though I am not modeling Pepacton specifically on this current layout, I will be using a couple of the structures.  I was digging through some old SD photo cards and came across a few photos I had taken of my version of the Pepacton Feed Store.  I thought I would share one here since IMO it is more interesting than most photos I have been posting to the thread.
Title: Re: Delaware & Northern Construction version 1.0
Post by: GPdemayo on February 16, 2018, 03:43:15 PM
Good looking feed store Jerry..... 8)
Title: Re: Delaware & Northern Construction version 1.0
Post by: jerryrbeach on February 17, 2018, 07:38:44 AM
Good looking feed store Jerry..... 8)

Thank you, Greg.  Compliments are always welcome!

I'm planning to find some time to work on the layout today, and maybe post an update.
Title: Re: Delaware & Northern Construction version 1.0
Post by: jerryrbeach on February 18, 2018, 09:59:47 AM
The track gang has been busy, though there is still a long way to go before they will be done. 

I used three different methods to cut the track.  My favorite, and the fastest is to use the Xuron flush cutting pliers.  The drawback is that only one side cuts flush.  The other side of the cut is jagged and the rail has to be cut again to make the ends square. 

The Dremel requires a steady hand to get a clean vertical and square cut.  If done right, both ends of the cut rails do not need a second cut to be ready to be used. 

I used the Zona saw and miter box for one specific cut where I needed both rails to fit together exactly and the Dremel would have removed too much material, ditto the Xuron. 

I used the triangular file to nick the tops of the rail to mark the cut location.  I used the flat file to square the ends of the rail if necessary, and also to remove any burrs caused by the cut. 

Not pictured in this photo because I was wearing them are my safety glasses.  Obviously, when using the Dremel, safety glasses are a necessity.  I wear them when cutting with the Xuron pliers, too, short cutoff rail ends fly fast and in unpredictable directions.  In fact, I usually put them on when I start working on the layout, and leave them on until I stop.
Title: Re: Delaware & Northern Construction version 1.0
Post by: jerryrbeach on February 18, 2018, 10:12:01 AM
I mentioned when describing the track planning that I had drawn the center line for the track onto the painted foam using the paper template.   I bonded the cork with the adhesive keeping it centered on the line.  This made it easy to align the track, as long as it is centered on the cork, everything fits as planned.  Once the cork was bonded in place, I used a sanding block with some 80 grit paper to sand the cork so that it was at a uniform height. 

First I would locate any turnouts, or other critical pieces, like the joints where the tables separate.  I would use some track nails to hold those pieces in place temporarily and measure and cut the adjacent tracks to length.  Once all pieces for one section were cut, I would test fit everything in place and make sure I had it as precise as possible. 

After that, I would lay it aside, lay down a bead of the latex caulk on the cork, spread the caulk thinly with a putty knife, then lay the track in place.  I would secure the track using track nails, most of which went back into the original holes I had made when test fitting everything.  After that, lots of weights and wait for the caulk to dry. 
SimplePortal 2.3.5 © 2008-2012, SimplePortal