Author Topic: Freight car weights  (Read 305 times)

Zephyrus52246

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Freight car weights
« on: September 19, 2017, 11:10:29 AM »
Like many of you, I have kits that have been lying around for decades.  To get out of my present modeling funk, I thought I'd build a couple of freight cars.  I had a couple of Des Plaines Hobby special run cars, one is an old Innovative Model works kit (later became Red Caboose).  It had instructions, but no parts diagram.  I had a similar Red Caboose kit, so I thought I'd build them both.  The IMW kit had a flat steel weight, the Caboose one didn't.  I thought this was odd, until I looked through some other Red Caboose kits, which had no weights, either.  One of them had a note that their weight supplier had increased the price of the weight by over 300%, so they no longer had weights included after June 2001 (!).  I had wondered why Accurail kits had large bolts in them for weights.  I guess this answered that question.  Anyway I sacrificed an old Athearn boxcar for it's weight, so I could continue.  You folks probably already had heard this about the weights, but I was surprised.


Jeff

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Re: Freight car weights
« Reply #1 on: September 19, 2017, 11:17:56 AM »
Some options for weighing cars:
1.  sticky 1/4 oz and 1/2 oz weights.  The one concern about the is how long the sticky lasts.  I like to add some CA glue just to be sure.  I like these a lot.  And if the freight car door is open, you can paint these and they'll kinda look like crates. 

2.  pennies. (US or Canadian :-) )
3.  chunks of lead weights salvaged from a auto/tire shop


dave





Modeling the Northeast in the 1890s - because the little voices told me to

Zephyrus52246

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Re: Freight car weights
« Reply #2 on: September 19, 2017, 11:31:55 AM »
Dave, I have some of those weights somewhere, but I'll be darned if I can find them.   ::)  On a recent Trainmasters TV video, they're building a resin freight car and used the similar bolts to the Accurail cars.  He used silicone adhesive because he said they can take some jarring and not come apart, unlike CA.


Jeff

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Re: Freight car weights
« Reply #3 on: September 19, 2017, 11:54:07 AM »
Gents..........

DON'T PAY FOR THEM  ! ! ! ! ! !

I put this up about this time every year and Jeff beat me to it.

The tire shops use these sorts of wheel weight all the time.  They cannot reused them as the sticky glue is a one time thing.  They do however recycle them and most areas have a lead recycler for various reasons.

So here's the plan.  Walk into the shop area and find the first guy you can find.  Tell him you are a model railroad junkie and use the weights for your modeling.  After they stop laughing they will lead you to the salvage bucket, usually a five gallon bucket that can only be slid across the floor.

Take as much as he offers and beat feet for the next tire shop.  Get a year's supply because right now in any northern climate is going through the snow tire change over; depending on state law of when they can go on the road.  Minnesota starts in July. ! ! ! ! !

When you get them home throw them in a tin can of lacquer thinner to soak off the glue.  The black stuff is NOT asbestos as that went out of brake pad material in the mid 1980's.

I use Walther's Goo for holding them to the interiors of freight cars.

see ya
Bob
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jbvb

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Re: Freight car weights
« Reply #4 on: September 26, 2017, 09:13:59 PM »
I usually hammer tire weights straight and flat on one side, so the Goo can hold better.  Sometimes I hammer shape them to fit inside the center sill of a passenger car which will get an interior.  Older weights had more lead and were easier to shape than the current stuff.  And some of the current tire weights have a plastic coating.  So far I've been able to leave that on...
James

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Re: Freight car weights
« Reply #5 on: September 26, 2017, 11:04:16 PM »
Yeah I like the tire lead weights.  I don't have to buy them.  I just go to my local parking lot and find them stuck to all the tires.  Is that wrong? In this world currently, I suspect not! ;) 

BandOGuy

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Re: Freight car weights
« Reply #6 on: September 27, 2017, 07:07:11 AM »
Might be easier to liberate them if you removed them from the wheels/rims versus the tires. Taking them from the tires runs the risk of puncturing the tire which could lead (LEED) to all kinds of nasty legal problems. Said problems could adversely impact modeling time, considered by many here as a sin. And you know where sinning leads you.
Repent! Think wheels instead of tires.  ;)
Working on my second million. I gave up on the first.

jbvb

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Re: Freight car weights
« Reply #7 on: September 27, 2017, 09:21:24 AM »
I just pick 'em up out of the gutter in early spring, after the snow melts but before the DPW gets out the street sweeper.  This might not work if I needed 1,000 cars for my layout, but in that case I wouldn't be building kits that came without weights.
James

 

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