Author Topic: Resin Freight Car Build  (Read 741 times)

CVSNE

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Re: Resin Freight Car Build
« Reply #15 on: September 14, 2017, 09:55:58 AM »
Marty,

All is well here, lost power for 54 hours and no damage tot he house or the layout building.

Life is good.

Tom ;D


Thrilled and relieved to hear that!


Best wishes,


Marty
Marty McGuirk
Manassas, VA

CVSNE

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Re: Resin Freight Car Build
« Reply #16 on: September 14, 2017, 10:08:48 AM »
Of course, the ACL Class O-17 17000-18999 series ventilated boxcars. How did I miss it? Thinking to much I guess.

Tom ;D


Actually, it's the Westerfield O-15 class ACL ventilated boxcar.

For those who don't know what a "ventilated" boxcar is, they were used to keep air movement through the car for shipping perishable items that didn't need to be refrigerated.  The most common nickname they had was "watermelon" cars - but they were used for all types of perishables.  Since they were basically standard boxcars with screen doors and solid doors on both sides of the car, they could be loaded up north and sent back to the south as a revenue generating move instead of an empty dead head movement.

The specific ACL cars were copies of the standard USRA double sheathed boxcar with steel ends (with vents), and the "double" doors on the side (one screen door, one standard door). (FEC had some very similar cars - those are also made by Westerfield).

https://id18538.securedata.net/westerfieldmodels.com/merchantmanager/product_info.php?cPath=143_337&products_id=412

I'm building two of them -
Kit 7001: The "as delivered" version (the yellow cars with the K type brakes)
Kit 7003 1940s-early 1950s version (with AB brakes).

Marty
Marty McGuirk
Manassas, VA

CVSNE

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Re: Resin Freight Car Build
« Reply #17 on: September 15, 2017, 10:08:45 AM »
A couple of tips -
It's somewhat unfortunate that some resin car kits, usuallly the one from a manufacture that most people encounter at a train show, have the worst instructions. (For years the running joke has been that a certain manufacturer's instructions all read: "(1) Open Box. (2) Build Car. (3) Paint and weather to suit. (4) Enjoy!"
Luckily most of them have improved their instructions - and a couple of manufacturers offer instructions and "guides" that make them the equivalent of SRMW instructions.
Westerfield's instructions fall somewhere in the middle. The photos are often fuzzy and make it hard to discern details, and since Westerfield offers a number of different variants of each kit based on era and/or road name, it's easy to get lost in the instructions. I've found it's a good idea to review the instructions and highlight the text that's applicable to the version of the car I'm building.

You'll quickly notice when building any resin freight car kit that the manufacturers often assume you know what the parts are, and the parts don't have any identifying markings on them. (A few manufacturers have started adding "keys" or diagrams that show what all the little pieces on the resin sheet are - but they're the exception).
Take for instance the ends of this car. At first glance they may look identical, but they're not. In this case the "B" (brake) end of the car has the retainer valve cast in place (indicated by the needle in the photo below).





If you miss this, you could easily assemble the body with the brake end in the wrong place relative to the underframe - something you won't notice until it comes time to add the brake rodding.

The most tedious part of building a resin freight car is cleaning up the parts (It's a little like adding bracing to a wood structure kit...)
But time and care spent on this task definitely shows on the finished model. Despite what the instructions say, I don't clean off all the parts before I start constructing the model. For one thing, I'd run out of enthusiasm before getting started, and for another I'd likely lose half the parts before getting everything together!

If there's any trick to this removing the flash it's to be careful to not accidentally remove any detail that should be there. A perfect example is the sides of the ends of this car - you might be tempted to sand the edge flat on your NWSL Tru-Sander - but you'd be removing the rivets and other details. 



To remove the resin flash for areas like this, I use a razor blade* held at a steep angle to scrape away the resin flash. I've found it's sometimes better to use a slightly dull razor blade for this scraping technique. A sharp, fresh blade can sometimes slice right into the resin whereas a dull blade will meet with just enough resistance that you can prevent it from digging into the part.





For areas like the openings for the vent I use a hobby knife and trim the resin flash to the edges, then use sanding sticks and/or files to true up the openings.





The trickiest piece to clean up on this car was the frame for the screen door - simply because it's relatively delicate.


To give you some idea of the approach I'm taking to this car, I plan to start by building up the basic body and underframe as two subassemblies, then join them together before installing the details.


All for now,


Marty
« Last Edit: September 15, 2017, 05:01:31 PM by CVSNE »
Marty McGuirk
Manassas, VA

CVSNE

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Re: Resin Freight Car Build
« Reply #18 on: September 18, 2017, 07:35:32 AM »
I forgot to include this picture in the last post - for the car end with the retainer valve casting (making it the brake wheel end of the car) I wrote a "B" on the inside of the part. I'll also add similar notes to the inside of other parts such as the floor and center sills.






Marty McGuirk
Manassas, VA

 

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