Author Topic: What building is this?  (Read 10448 times)

rpdylan

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Re: What building is this?
« Reply #15 on: May 27, 2017, 02:02:26 AM »
looking great Frank!  Where do you get that thick card stock?  I was looking at the "task board" that Micro Mark sells, have you ever used that stuff for scratch building? I was thinking of buying some.....
Bob C.

Erieman

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Re: What building is this?
« Reply #16 on: May 27, 2017, 12:47:24 PM »
looking great Frank!  Where do you get that thick card stock?  I was looking at the "task board" that Micro Mark sells, have you ever used that stuff for scratch building? I was thinking of buying some.....


Bob,


I purchased the 5 ply cardstock from a local Art store. I don't think Hobby Lobby or Michael's would carry this product.  It takes several swipes with a knife to get through it, but I have found it to work very well. I have seen task board but cannot answer how it would work in this situation. I think it would be fine. One question though, Can you make a cut to the task board if the bracing was assembled. Sometimes I have had to make a cut with the entire base and bracing assembled. Just wondering.


Thanks for stopping by. Next couple of posts will deal with the painting technique that i used on the building.


Frank / Erieman

Donato

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Re: What building is this?
« Reply #17 on: May 27, 2017, 12:56:07 PM »
Outstanding craftsmanship Frank!!

Thanks,
Donato

Biding my time till I can start my layout and build nice stuff like all you folks .... (said with envy). :-)

MAP

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Re: What building is this?
« Reply #18 on: May 28, 2017, 06:16:39 AM »
Wow!  Great start on this build Frank.  I'm following along
Mark

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Re: What building is this?
« Reply #19 on: May 28, 2017, 01:25:18 PM »
Good Morning All.


This weathering technique is one that I saw in one of Bob Van Gelder's SRMW kits. I have experimented and expanded what Bob demonstrated. Since using it on Yakima Apples, I have used it several other times. I use water base acrylics exclusively. I really like the color options and the consistency of color, bottle to bottle.
STEP ONE - After the wood has been braced on the back, I erase any pencil marks that might be on the front surface. Since I am going to do a lot of panels, I have a large painting surface. Assemble the following: A 1" brush, a container with clean water and a container for the paint. I do not use the paint full strength, because it hides all the wood details. So-o-o, add a bit of water to the brush, dip it into the paint and mix it to a creamy consistency. Not to runny or not to thick. This will take a bit of experimentation.


Work quickly to apply the paint to one board at a time checking to see how it is drying. Too wet and you will wipe of most of the paint. Too dry and it will be difficult to get the right amount removed. Again, experiment. Apply paint to one board at a time and then wipe each panel before it dries
Wipe the panels with a good clean cloth. like a terry towel. The tooth of the towel helps to remove paint in the cracks of the clapboard siding.
Once finished painting every panel, let it dry overnight.


STEP TWO - I have three bottles of A&I; light, medium and dark. After the panels have dried, Apply a medium coat of A&I and let dry. I work with a sample panel so that I can verify color, stain ,etc.. The sample panel is a piece of clapboard siding that has been braced and is of a size that I can experiment with BEFORE I actually execute painting or staining.


The following photo shows you the grain of the wood after the paint has been applied and wiped.


Next up, Stain and first coat of weathering.


Frank / Erieman

ACL1504

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Re: What building is this?
« Reply #20 on: May 28, 2017, 01:28:17 PM »
Frank,

Thanks for the excellent tutorial on how you paint and weather the walls.

I really like the color. You are doing an excellent job on a repeat structure.

Tom ;D
If you hate plan A, you are certainly not going to like plan B!

Tom Langford
telsr1@aol.com

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Re: What building is this?
« Reply #21 on: May 28, 2017, 08:20:36 PM »
Frank,

Thanks for the excellent tutorial on how you paint and weather the walls.

I really like the color. You are doing an excellent job on a repeat structure.

Tom ;D


Tom,


Thanks for stopping by. More tutorial follows. There are  total of five layers of pigment, with a few other elements thrown in. All exterior walls have been cut, braced, painted with the base coat of green. The second element is medium A&I.  Again, using the sample piece. Check the color or technique BEFORE proceeding with the balance of the next layer. That means apply the layer and letting it dry for 12 to 24 hours. Don't work about consistency. The next level is called grime and the application is interesting.
The pic below is the sample with the total background with the first coat and 1/2 of the second coat applied. A&I give s the green color an interesting "dull" appearance. It is difficult to see this effect on the photo. The goal is to apply a color that appears "worn".
Tomorrow, I will paint what I call grime. Stay tuned.


Frank / Erieman

Erieman

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Re: What building is this?
« Reply #22 on: May 29, 2017, 10:14:36 AM »
    Now that the first "layer" has been applied to all the panels and dried, it is time to apply the next level. You might ask, what is Frank trying to show with all these levels. Well, good question. The multiple layers are added to show a building that had deteriorating paint on it and that in some cases, you can see the base material. We don't want to see the wood, hence the first coat of green. Level two is the application of A&I to darken the first green color. I used "Greenscape" from Folk Art Acrylic paint. It is a nice warm blue green.
    With the first application of A&I, the green takes on a totally different color and it is now somewhat darker. Once the A&I has been applied to all the panels, it is now time to apply the third level. I use Americana "White Wash". I thin the pigment slightly to get a very light coat. I do not brush it on, but "dry brush" it on only parts of the wooden siding. using a 3/4" nylon brush, I highlight the "tips" of each board. This implies that the tip is the only part of the siding that still has some pigment from the original application, which was white. Let this dry overnight.
    With the "white wash now dry, I now add the nail holes using a pounce wheel. After that is done to all panels, I apply A&I to each panel to highlight the nail holes. This is also a good time to highlight some of the boards by taking a knife and lifting them to give the appearance of siding that is warping. You can do as little or as much as you want. You might want to do panels that are on one side of the building implying that the weather is "typically" from that side. Your call. I typically do one side more heavily that the others, but each side has some form of distressed siding.
   After letting the white layer dry, i apply a " full strength" layer of dry brushed white pigment. These seems excessive and there are 12 panels, but the end result is quite interesting.  The important thing is not to be in a rush.


I added the last picture to show a close up of the final layer. looking at the pic you will see from left to right, a light application of "white wash" ( name of the paint) and on the right side, a heavier dry brush. Your call on what you want to use.


Frank / Erieman
 
« Last Edit: May 29, 2017, 10:23:53 AM by Erieman »

Erieman

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Re: What building is this?
« Reply #23 on: May 29, 2017, 11:19:42 AM »
I forgot to mention something very important on the prior post - brush strokes. On the first application of "White wash", apply using horizontal strokes. This layer is mixed with a bit of water. ( dip you brush occasionally)brush the paint / water mixture horizontally in a random pattern.


With the second coat of White Wash, the application is small amounts of full strength applied from top to bottom. Some places you want to see the green beneath. This is random and you best experiment with this technique until you understand it and, more importantly, you like the final results.


Frank / Erieman

SteveCuster

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Re: What building is this?
« Reply #24 on: May 29, 2017, 03:41:41 PM »
Very cool Frank. That's some of the most complex bracing I've ever seen on the interior of a structure. Looks like a great building design too. I'm following along with this one.

-Steve

jerryrbeach

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Re: What building is this?
« Reply #25 on: May 30, 2017, 07:18:39 AM »
Frank,
Fantastic tutorial on how you finish your walls.  Thank you so much for sharing, you made it easy to understand and follow from your text and photos.  I had never thought of using A/I as an intermediate step.  Great tutorial!!!
Jerry

GPdemayo

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Re: What building is this?
« Reply #26 on: May 30, 2017, 08:55:17 AM »
Love the job you did on the walls Frank.....can't wait to see this one up close.  8)
Gregory P. DeMayo
General Construction Superintendent Emeritus
St. Louis & Denver Railroad
Longwood, FL

Erieman

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Re: What building is this?
« Reply #27 on: May 30, 2017, 03:38:48 PM »
Love the job you did on the walls Frank.....can't wait to see this one up close.  8)


Greg,


Thanks for stopping by. Still a long way to go and there are two structures!!!


Frank / Erieman

Erieman

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Re: What building is this?
« Reply #28 on: May 30, 2017, 03:41:13 PM »
Frank,
Fantastic tutorial on how you finish your walls.  Thank you so much for sharing, you made it easy to understand and follow from your text and photos.  I had never thought of using A/I as an intermediate step.  Great tutorial!!!


Jerry,


Thanks for your kind words. Glad you are enjoying the post. As i mentioned, I have used A&I in many ways and find it very inexpensive and works great. I need to have someone try this technique and reconfirm how it works.


Frank / Erieman

Erieman

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Re: What building is this?
« Reply #29 on: May 30, 2017, 03:43:14 PM »
Very cool Frank. That's some of the most complex bracing I've ever seen on the interior of a structure. Looks like a great building design too. I'm following along with this one.

-Steve


Steve,


Thanks for stopping by. Bracing is one of the most important parts of any scratchbuilt structure. You would hate to take all this time to build something only to have it warp. Been there and have the "T" shirt. Not going back. Bracing is quick and cheap.


Frank / Erieman

 

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