Author Topic: What are your thoughts on weathering a model? Locos, Rollingstock or Structures  (Read 457 times)

tct855

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With all the demand on manufacturers to produce more & more accurate detailed models, isn't proper weathering also part of your demand list?  Why is weathering always included & expected in modeling contests, but not our everyday modeling?

What is too light weathering for your models (just dusting)?
What is too heavy weathering for your models (de-stressed or altered parts)?

Should there be a monolithic weathering theme for your models (all light eveningly applied)?
Should there be a varied weathering theme (light, medium, heavy uneven throughout)?

Are your very rare or expensive models weathered?
Are very well well done weathered models or very poorly weathered models an a incentive or distraction to try weathering yourself? (ARE YOU AFRAID OR EXCITED OF WEATHERING?)

What say you?
« Last Edit: September 05, 2017, 07:41:34 AM by tct855 »

tct855

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My thoughts on weathering are:

Weathering is an inclusive finish part of modeling. (even a freshly washed prototype has weathering still on it).

I believe all models should be completed with varied amounts of weathering throughout.  I don't like to see a modeled town or unit train with all the same cookie cutter weathering applied.

I'm a bigger fan of realistic (as possible) or whimsical weathering over almost nil or very light weathering (if you're going to weather a model, then weather it!) Unless it's a particular newer prototype, which are few and far between.

I think any modeler who weathers him or herself is the best weathering (irregardless of ones ability) (there's always someone better or worst than you).   The point is, weathering is any other equal part of modeling, one must practice to improve.

The best part of weathering allows me to cover up all my mistakes on building or painting or detailing models.  ;D   
                                  Thanx Thom...

BandOGuy

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My thoughts on weathering are:

I think any modeler who weathers him or herself is in need of a shower.  8)
Working on my second million. I gave up on the first.

bparrish

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Thom....

You come up with the best questions........

Weathering is a subjective thing that is in the eye of the modeler.  Some modelers want they pike to look like the world ought to be, as they see it.  Clean not too shinny and orderly.  Then there is George.........

Most of us are somewhere in between.

My thoughts are these:

Structures are going to weather differently only altered by the perceived age of the modeled building; ten years old or fifty years old, side by side.  They will look different for a myriad of reasons. But one thing will be common to all structures on a given railroad.  Dirt.  The dirt found in an area will be common to all weathered buildings  in a town.

Not so much with rolling stock.

If you are modeling a short line where everything is close by, then the same notions of local dirt hold up.

But..... if you are modeling an interchange then you have random cars coming onto your railroad from all over the place.  Most notably cars that have traversed the deep south with the deep red dirt of Georgia.

There is a similar orange dirt that comes out of the desert south west.

Cars crossing the great basin of Nevada will come out with a cement grey coating that gets into everything.

On my railroad there is a fair amount of weathering but with rolling stock I do something a bit different.  When a new car goes on the rails it has nearly no weathering.  About once a  year I run standards on all cars; wheel gauge, coupler height and wheel flange cleaning.  When those new clean cars come across the bench they then get a bit of weathering and a notation on the roster is made for first stage.  I have no problem finding them the first trip across. The second year they get the second hit of grunge and that is where it will be forever.

It is interesting to note when my operators make a comment about some car that seems to have changed but they can't quite put their finger on what I might have done.

This is a great hobby.

thanx
Bob
All it takes to start and insane asylum is a big room and the right kind of people.

Boxcar

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Thom,

You bring up a great topic.. Mostly, the scenic area defines the area to be weathered.. But if anything, as you state, everything needs to be weathered.. even a newly washed and waxed car still have some weathering to it.. Anyhow, great topic! Dan

bparrish

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Boxcar..........

Welcome aboard.

see ya
Bob
All it takes to start and insane asylum is a big room and the right kind of people.

deemery

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I enjoy weathering both because it helps my models look better and because there are so many different techniques to try.  Weathering is one thing that I'm never bored doing.


dave
Modeling the Northeast in the 1890s - because the little voices told me to

bagman

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Whatever you think looks best works for me Thom !
You have a done a great job over the years on my loco's and rolling stock.


That being said, I agree with the thoughts of Chairman Bob. Weathering is very subjective and I believe he is correct in saying that most people sit somewhere in the middle.


What I look for is a "goldilocks approach"...not too much but just enough to take the shine off loco's, freight cars and structures etc.
But that's just me....I can understand why other people like to go the whole hog and weather something so it replicates the real world.


As has often been quoted in the past, it's your model railroad and you can do what you want no matter what other people think.


Now get back to weathering those cars I sent you Thom !


D








tct855

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Cars you sent me?

                           Huh?

                                   Me no speaka Australian? :-X

bparrish

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Wow....

I got a promotion. 

The Bagman addressed me as  chairman

Not sure what the job description but I guess I'm ok with it. 

See ya
Bob
All it takes to start and insane asylum is a big room and the right kind of people.

ReadingBob

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I think the previous answers sum things up pretty well.  I'll just add that, in my humble opinion, 0% weathering equals toy like in appearance.  Everything can use some degree of weathering slight as it may be.

Applying an A&I wash to darken the recessed areas (to emulate shadows) and dry-brushing a lighter color to highlight the raised surfaces (to emulate light) is the minimum amount of weathering, if you want to call it that, that I'd consider on structures and structure details.  I guess you could argue that doing that is not really weathering as opposed to adding things like rust streaks/stains, oil spills, grime, etc.

I'm still a neophyte when it comes to rolling stock and locomotives.  It is a skill I want to develop though.   :)
Bob Butts
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ACL1504

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Like Reading Bob, I feel the answers are pretty standard. However, I'll add my .03 cents worth.


Also, like Bob Parrish sated, weathering is very subjective.


When I was professionally painting brass locos, the weathering issue was the most contentious subject.

What I call light weathering, you may see it as moderate or medium. I had several categories for weathering. They were a very light dusting, light, moderate, medium, heavy, used but not abused and used and abused.

Most of my customers just wanted a nice semi-gloss or satin finish to the locomotive.

I think freight cars should have a little bit of everything regarding weathering. Locomotives, steam and diesel, your choice.

I haven't weathered any passenger equipment as yet but I'll make the cars pretty much the same in regards to weathering. I plan on having  my passenger equipment and locos weathered with a light dusting or light weathering.

Tom ;D
If you hate plan A, you are certainly not going to like plan B!

Tom Langford
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